Adolescent Stress Linked to Severe Adult Mental Illness, Mouse Study Suggests

A study conducted at John Hopkins University has identified a link between juvenile stress and later onset of mental illness

“We have discovered a mechanism for how environmental factors, such as stress hormones, can affect the brain’s physiology and bring about mental illness,” says study leader Akira Sawa, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry and┬ábehavioural┬ásciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Our children have much to deal with that earlier generations didn’t.

Some concerns, like war, famine and natural disasters, have always been with us, but for kids today, these events are in their faces all day long; on TV, on the computer, on the tablet, on the big news screen in the city.

Pre-teens obsess about their waistlines and many tiny Australians today are well aware of the Sandy Hook school massacre in the US.

Children usually respond well to hypnosis, which is a totally side effect free way of combating the excess stress in their lives. They often can quite easily become competent at self hypnosis.

These various sources of additional stress in young lives can affect childrens’ ┬ábehaviour, relationships and academic performance.

And now it appears that there may possibly be long term effects on their mental health as well.

To read the entire report in Science Daily, click here

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