The effectiveness of Hypnosis

This article*, written by Mike Bundrant appeared in Natural News in April 2013. It describes the ways hypnosis influences the various frequency waves produced in the human brain and talks about a range of empirical evidence showing the positive physiological effects of hypnosis.

The validity of therapeutic hypnosis as a complementary modality is becoming recognized, as studies prove brainwave activity changes with hypnotic depth. As we move from the high-energy beta wave state to the slower theta waves, we experience perceptual and physiological changes; for example our eyes flutter, breathing is more rhythmic, the body is relaxed and time is distorted.

Interestingly, children and animals tend to reside in the alpha/theta waves, thus are more intuitive and emotional. According to Crawford, a prominent researcher in the hypnotic field, different parts of the brain are activated during hypnosis – some increasing from 13%-28%. Preliminary results also suggest the reward pathway in the brain involving dopamine is stimulated. In fact, research using fMRI shows that hypnosis requires more mental effort, hence individuals are in a heightened state of awareness.

The power of hypnosis coupled with suggestion changes belief systems by reframing the meaning we place on experience. William Tiller, a former Professor Emeritus at Stanford University aptly states, “What we give meaning to we become.”

Studies on the effects of hypnotherapy abound, for example, those tested positive for tuberculosis using the Mantoux test method were able to inhibit the test reaction following hypnotic suggestion. Interestingly, the use of cooling images for burn victims greatly increased speed of recovery. Hypnotic suggestions given pre and post surgery reduced the need for excessive anesthesia and medication.

This clearly shows that hypnosis has a neuropsychoimmunological effect on the individual; highlighting its versatility, encompassing far more than it’s traditional uses for habit management, fears and weight loss. So what allows us to delve into this part of ourselves? Consciousness is defined as awareness. How many of us are completely aware of every waking moment? Read On

* http://www.naturalnews.com/039759_medical_hypnosis_studies_effectiveness.html – Natural News April 3rd, 2013, by Mike Bundrant.

 

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