addiction

Hypnotherapy for Gambling Addiction

With more and more people gambling and with online gambling outlets increasing, there are more reported cases of Gambling Addiction then ever before.

Gambling problems can manifest themselves in many different ways. Some problem gamblers will have all of the signs of their gambling problem and some others may only have one. Gambling addiction affects players of all different forms of gambling.

The most important thing to remember is just because their life is not horrible because of their gambling does not mean there is not a problem; many people can have serious gambling addictions and still hold down a job and other may think averything is fine.

Many addicts will stop socializing with anyone not into their addiction, so if suddenly someone you know cuts out all their friends from their life and starts to isolate themselves this can be a sign.

We now know that there are many contributing factors to gambling addiction. For example, the sensations experienced during a gambling episode may trigger the release of hormones into the brain that actually give a feeling of wellbeing – during that moment.

Past experiences that may have been long forgotten at the consious level are often a hidden driver leading towards excessive gambling behavior.

Because these experiences lie buried in the subconsious, no amount of talking can resolve the probelm.

However, because hypnosis works at the subconscious level,  it can be highly effective in resolving these long forgotten issues.

As a Clinical Hypnotherapist with nearly thirty years experience, I see many gambling addicts at my practice in Highgate Hill in Brisbane.

It does take effort, but if a gambler wants to control the addiction it can be done.

I have helped many gamblers retake control of their lives.

Posted by admin in Addictions, 0 comments

Hypnosis and Gambling Addiction

With the risk of the federal government rescinding laws aimed at helping problem gamblers, the need for effective solutions to this problem has never been more urgent.

An article, entitled Problem Gambling: Treatment Strategies and Rationale For the Use of Hypnosis as a Treatment Adjunct, published several years ago in the Australian Journal of  Clinical and experimental Hypnosis* by Gre J Corman, Barry J. Evans and Graham D. Burrows AO, had this to say about the use of hypnosis in the treatment of Gambling Addiction:

“Hypnosis can be a valuable adjunct to treatment for problem gambling and can be introduced early in therapy. It is vital to assess contra-indications to the use of hypnosis, especially co-existent depression, personality disorder, or criminal intent or activity.

There is practically no reference in research or clinical literature to the use of hypnosis in the treatment of gambling problems. However, our belief that hypnosis should be considered as a part of therapy is based on its proven efficacy in the treatment of compulsive and habit disorders, anxiety disorders, and addictive disorders (Burrows & Dennerstein, 1988; Evans, 1995; Hammond, 1990). There are also many clinical and experimental reports of the use of hypnosis in heightening the efficacy of desensitisation, imagery, cognitive-behavioural, and cognitive therapies (Burrows & Stanley, 1995; Hammond, 1990). Hypnotherapeutic techniques are also useful for ego-strengthening and increasing self-esteem (Stanton, 1993).”

Hypnosis is an effective, side effect free way of treating all additions including Gambling Addiction.

Being located close to the CBD, (and Brisbane’s only Casino), I regularly see clients whose lives are being devastated by this terrible addiction. In most cases, the addiction is dealt with and the compulsive gambling stops permanently.

*Australian Journal of of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, November 1996, Volume 24 Number 2, Greg J. Coman Addiction Research Institute; Barry J. Evans Monash University; Graham D. Burrows AO Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne/Austin & repatriation Medical Cetre

Posted by admin in Addictions, 0 comments

Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders.

An approach described in a paper* published it the American journal of Clinical Hypnosis, describes the use of hypnosis for the treatment of substance abuse disorders, borrowing from studies effectively treating alcoholism by using intensive daily sessions. Combining the more intense treatment of 20 daily sessions with hypnosis is a successful method to treat addictions. The treatment has been used with 18 clients over the last 7 years and has shown a 77 percent success rate for at least a 1-year follow-up.

According to Martensen (1997), in the nineteenth century hypnosis and alcoholism medically converged and the results were very good. There were as high as 80% success rates with samples of up to 700 patients reported. By 1910, because of its growing prevalence as entertainment, ethical professionals were using hypnosis less for treatment of any medical or psychological disorder. By 1920, hypnosis was rarely used in the treatment of alcoholism.
However, hypnosis has begun making a comeback as a viable treatment for alcoholism and other addictions. Wolberg (1948) treated alcoholism by using hypnosis to enhance dream imagery. Lemere (1959), using a conditioned reflex treatment, reported a 57% success rate on a one-year follow up. Success was based on abstinence from alcohol. Feamster and Brown (1963) successfully hypnosis to control excessive drinking.

The study involved 18 participants (16 men and 2 women) were clients who voluntarily sought treatment at a private practice facility. The age range was 18 to 63 years, and the mean age was 37 years. There was one African American client, and the rest were Caucasian. Of the 18 clients, 15 were being seen for alcoholism or alcohol abuse, 2 clients were being seen for cocaine addiction, and 1 client had a marijuana addiction.

The study results were, “Of the 18 clients who started the 20-session program, and most attending aftercare sessions, 12 remained drug- free. Two clients returned to moderate drinking, and appear to be doing well. Two clients relapsed to abusive drinking, and one of those clients was charged with a third driving-under-the-influence citation.”

You can read the entire study here.

* Intensive Therapy – Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders, Greg Potter American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 47:1, July 2004

Posted by admin in Addictions, 0 comments

Hypnosis for Alcoholism

Hypnotherapy has a long history of success in the treatment of addictions.

In a paper entitled, Intensive Therapy: Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorder*, Greg Potter PhD records explains that hypnosis was widely used around the turn of the Twentieth Century. Howevr, by 1910, due to the  increasing appearance of hypnosis as entertainment, it became less commonly used by the medical profession  due to this association.

Potter goes on to say,  “According to Martensen (1997), in the nineteenth century hypnosis and alcoholism medically converged and the results were very good. There were as high as 80% success rates with samples of up to 700 patients reported. By 1910, because of its growing prevalence as entertainment, ethical professionals were using hypnosis less for treatment of any medical or psychological disorder. By 1920, hypnosis was rarely used in the treatment of alcoholism.

However, hypnosis has begun making a comeback as a viable treatment for alcoholism and other addictions. Wolberg (1948) treated alcoholism by using hypnosis to enhance dream imagery. Lemere (1959), using a conditioned reflex treatment, reported a 57% success rate on a one-year follow up. Success was based on abstinence from alcohol.

Feamster and Brown (1963) successfully used an aversive treatment through hypnosis to control excessive drinking.”

* Intensive Therapy: Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorder*, Greg Potter PhD American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 47:1, July 2004. Copyright 2004 by the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis

Posted by admin in Addictions, 0 comments

Hypnotherapy and Addiction

Hypnotherapy is becoming more commonly used as a treatment option for people trying to break a substance abuse cycle of dependence, especially in follow-up care to help prevent relapse.

Like drug therapy that is used to treat cravings and modify behaviors, hypnotherapy should be administered qualified therapists. It is considered a piece of a comprehensive treatment program, and is gaining more recognition nationwide as a viable option for addiction therapy.

In some cases, hypnosis is linked to a reduction in harmful behaviors. It can also be used to give patients a greater feeling of control over their own recovery.

Hypnosis may reduce desires for addictive behaviors because it aids in relaxation. In a relaxed state of awareness, a patient may become more open and accepting of recovering from their addiction. While some hypnotists may be able to move into recovering deep personal issues with the patient, this type of approach may be better left with professional addiction counselors.

In addition, hypnosis is side effect free, and can be a valuable tool is discovering and dealing with the root causes of the addictive behavior, thus reducing the likelihood of a later relapse.

However, as a tool for calming the mind and revealing new perspectives for people suffering from addiction, hypnotherapy is receiving increased attention as experts look to refine treatment options for a growing number of compulsions and addictions.

Posted by admin in Addictions, 0 comments